Boston Haskell

As requested, here are the slides from Dan Doel's excellent presentation on Homotopy and Directed Type Theory from this past Monday's Boston Haskell.

I am very pleased to officially announce Hac Boston, a Haskell hackathon to be held January 20-22, 2012 at MIT in Cambridge, MA. The hackathon will officially kick off at 2:30 Friday afternoon, and go until 5pm on Sunday with the occasional break for sleep.

Everyone is welcome -- you do not have to be a Haskell guru to attend! Helping hack on someone else's project could be a great way to increase your Haskell skills.

If you plan on coming, please officially register, even if you already put your name on the wiki. Registration, travel, some information about lodging and many other details can now be found on the Hac Boston wiki.

We have confirmed space for about 30 people, so please register early! Beyond that we'll have to either seek additional space or close registration.

We're also looking for a few people interested in giving short (15-20 min.) talks, probably on Saturday afternoon. Anything of interest to the Haskell community is fair game---a project you've been working on, a paper, a quick tutorial. If you'd like to give a talk, add it on the wiki.

We look forward to seeing you at MIT!

A couple of days ago, I gave a talk at Boston Haskell about a shiny new speculative evaluation library, speculation on hackage, that I have implemented in Haskell. The implementation is based on the material presented as "Safe Programmable Speculative Parallelism" by Prakash Prabhu, G Ramalingam, and Kapil Vaswani at last month's PLDI.

I've uploaded a copy of my slides here:

* Introducing Speculation [PowerPoint | PDF]


I've put together a poll about when folks would like to have the next meeting, if you're going to be in the area, please help us pick a date and time that works for you!


I gave a talk last night at Boston Haskell on finger trees.

In particular I spent a lot of time focusing on how to derive the construction of Hinze and Paterson's 2-3 finger trees via an extended detour into a whole menagerie of tree types, and less on particular applications of the final resulting structure.


I'll be giving a talk tomorrow, Wednesday, September 16th, 2009 at the Boston Haskell User Group in the MIT CSAIL Reading Room (on the 8th floor of the William H. Gates tower of the Stata center) about mixing Oleg's iteratees with parsec and monoids to build practical parallel parsers and to cheaply reparse after local modifications are made to source code.

Ravi is trying to organize some time before hand during which people can get together and work on Haskell projects, or spend some time learning Haskell, so its not all scary academic stuff.

The meeting is scheduled from 7-9pm, and an ever growing number of us have been wandering down to the Cambridge Brewing Company afterwards to hang out and talk.

If you are curious about Haskell, or even an expert, or just happen to be interested in parallel programming and find yourself in the area, come on by.