September 2009

I'll be giving a talk tomorrow, Wednesday, September 16th, 2009 at the Boston Haskell User Group in the MIT CSAIL Reading Room (on the 8th floor of the William H. Gates tower of the Stata center) about mixing Oleg's iteratees with parsec and monoids to build practical parallel parsers and to cheaply reparse after local modifications are made to source code.

Ravi is trying to organize some time before hand during which people can get together and work on Haskell projects, or spend some time learning Haskell, so its not all scary academic stuff.

The meeting is scheduled from 7-9pm, and an ever growing number of us have been wandering down to the Cambridge Brewing Company afterwards to hang out and talk.

If you are curious about Haskell, or even an expert, or just happen to be interested in parallel programming and find yourself in the area, come on by.

Two concepts come up when talking about information retrieval in most standard documentation, Precision and Recall. Precision is a measure that tells you if your result set contains only results that are relevant to the query, and recall tells you if your result set contains everything that is relevant to the query.

The formula for classical precision is:

Precision Formula

However, I would argue that the classical notion of Precision is flawed, in that it doesn't model anything we tend to care about. Rarely are we interested in binary classification, instead we want a ranked classification of relevance.